Tune in on Tuesdays for Oxygen Health & Fitness TV

It’s the Daily News and I’ve got a special Episode of Oxygen Health & Fitness TV.  This week I’m cheating a little bit because the message I have for you here has more importance than any new information I could give you.

You see, I need your help.  By helping me you’ll actually be doing a good deed and helping the Make a Wish Foundation grant the wishes of critically ill children.

90 seconds of your time to help kids with life threatening medical conditions.  I know you’re busy and your time is limited.  But it’s not as limited as some people.
Click here to see how you can get involved and support such a worthwile cause.

Push Ups for Charity is beingt hosted by Kiama Bootcamp this Saturday 11th February at 7.30am!

Comments

  1. Maybe they felt they earned a break after this….China has been the srcoue of many inventions, including the Four Great Inventions: papermaking, the compass, gunpowder, and printing (both woodblock and movable type). The list below contains these and other inventions. The Chinese invented technologies involving mechanics, hydraulics, and mathematics applied to horology, metallurgy, astronomy, agriculture, engineering, music theory, craftsmanship, nautics, and warfare. By the Warring States Period (403 221 BC), they had advanced metallurgic technology, including the blast furnace and cupola furnace, while the finery forge and puddling process were known by the Han Dynasty (202 BC AD 220). A sophisticated economic system in China gave birth to inventions such as paper money during the Song Dynasty (960 1279). The invention of gunpowder by the 10th century led to an array of inventions such as the fire lance, land mine, naval mine, hand cannon, exploding cannonballs, multistage rocket, and rocket bombs with aerodynamic wings and explosive payloads. With the navigational aid of the 11th-century compass and ability to steer at high sea with the 1st-century sternpost rudder, premodern Chinese sailors sailed as far as East Africa and Egypt. In water-powered clockworks, the premodern Chinese had used the escapement mechanism since the 8th century and the endless power-transmitting chain drive in the 11th century. They also made large mechanical puppet theaters driven by waterwheels and carriage wheels and wine-serving automatons driven by paddle wheel boats. The contemporaneous Peiligang and Pengtoushan cultures represent the oldest Neolithic cultures of China and were formed around 7000 BC.[5] Some of the first inventions of Neolithic, prehistoric China include semilunar and rectangular stone knives, stone hoes and spades, the cultivation of millet, rice and the soybean, the refinement of sericulture, the building of rammed earth structures with lime-plastered house floors, the creation of the potter’s wheel, the creation of pottery with cord-mat-basket designs, the creation of pottery tripods and pottery steamers, and the development of ceremonial vessels and scapulimancy for purposes of divination.[6][7] Francesca Bray argues that the domestication of the ox and buffalo during the Longshan culture (c. 3000 c. 2000 BC) period, the absence of Longshan-era irrigation or high-yield crops, full evidence of Longshan cultivation of dry-land cereal crops which gave high yields “only when the soil was carefully cultivated,” suggest that the plow was known at least by the Longshan culture period and explains the high agricultural production yields which allowed the rise of Chinese civilization during the Shang Dynasty (c. 1600 c. 1050 BC).[8] With later inventions such as the multiple-tube seed drill and heavy moldboard iron plow, China’s agricultural output could sustain a much larger population. Source: Wikipedia

  2. Wham bam thank you, ma’am, my questions are answered!

  3. It’s so good!And I agree. There are a lot of amazing stories being lived. I think we can sometimes lose our own because we get so wrapped-up in everyone else’s! What a great point to be looking for it in our own.Thanks, Jamie!

  4. It will be hard to decide, but I think the Red Thread Crafts pattern I love most (and will likely purchase first!) is the Lion and Lamb pattern. The Birds and Beasts pattern is amazing and I know a very talented embroiderer who would love that design.

  5. Ben January 12, 2011 – 7:59 am I hope the authorities are investigating these die offs. Even if it happens normally in nature, this sure is a lot of incidents all at the same time. Maybe there is some larger cause we should know about.

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